Etymology
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bluster (v.)

late 14c., "stray blindly or blunderingly, wander aimlessly, go astray;" c. 1400, of persons, "shout loudly and angrily," from a Low German source, such as Middle Low German blüstren "to blow violently," East Frisian blüstern "to bluster," probably from the same source as blow (v.1), or perhaps imitative. Of weather in English from mid-15c. Related: Blustered; blustering.

bluster (n.)

1580s, "a storm of violent wind," from bluster (v.). Meaning "noisy, boisterous, inflated talk" is from 1704.

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Definitions of bluster
1
bluster (n.)
noisy confusion and turbulence;
he was awakened by the bluster of their preparations
bluster (n.)
a swaggering show of courage;
Synonyms: bravado
bluster (n.)
a violent gusty wind;
bluster (n.)
vain and empty boasting;
Synonyms: braggadocio / rodomontade / rhodomontade
2
bluster (v.)
blow hard; be gusty, as of wind;
The flames blustered
A southeaster blustered onshore
bluster (v.)
show off;
Synonyms: boast / tout / swash / shoot a line / brag / gas / blow / vaunt / gasconade
bluster (v.)
act in an arrogant, overly self-assured, or conceited manner;
Synonyms: swagger / swash
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near bluster

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Boanerges