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bench (n.)

Old English benc "long seat," especially one without a back, from Proto-Germanic *bankon(source also of Old Frisian bank "bench," Old Norse bekkr, Danish bænk, Middle Dutch banc, Old High German banch). The group is cognate with bank (n.2) "natural earthen incline beside a body of water," and perhaps the original notion is "man-made earthwork used as a seat."

Used from late 14c. of a merchant's table. From c. 1300 in reference to the seat where judges sat in court, hence, by metonymy, "judges collectively, office of a judge." Hence also bencher "senior member of an inn of court" (1580s). Sporting sense "reserve of players" (in baseball, North American football, etc.) is by 1909, from literal sense of place where players sit when not in action (attested by 1889). A bench-warrant (1690s) is one issued by a judge, as opposed to one issued by an ordinary justice or magistrate.

bench (v.)

"to take out of a (baseball) game," 1902, from bench (n.) in the sporting sense. Earlier it meant "to display (a dog) in a dog show" (1863). Related: Benched; benching. Old English had a verb bencian, but it meant "to make benches."

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Definitions of bench from WordNet
1
bench (n.)
a long seat for more than one person;
bench (n.)
a level shelf of land interrupting a declivity (with steep slopes above and below);
Synonyms: terrace
bench (n.)
persons who administer justice;
Synonyms: judiciary
bench (n.)
a strong worktable for a carpenter or mechanic;
Synonyms: workbench / work bench
bench (n.)
the reserve players on a team;
our team has a strong bench
bench (n.)
(law) the seat for judges in a courtroom;
2
bench (v.)
take out of a game; of players;
bench (v.)
exhibit on a bench;
bench the poodles at the dog show
3
Bench (n.)
the magistrate or judge or judges sitting in court in judicial capacity to compose the court collectively;
From wordnet.princeton.edu