Etymology
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awe (n.)

c. 1300, aue, "fear, terror, great reverence," earlier aghe, c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse agi "fright;" from Proto-Germanic *agiz- (source also of Old English ege "fear," Old High German agiso "fright, terror," Gothic agis "fear, anguish"), from PIE *agh-es- (source also of Greek akhos "pain, grief"), from root *agh- (1) "to be depressed, be afraid" (see ail). Current sense of "dread mixed with admiration or veneration" is due to biblical use with reference to the Supreme Being. To stand in awe (early 15c.) originally was simply to stand awe. Awe-inspiring is recorded from 1814.

Al engelond of him stod awe.
["The Lay of Havelok the Dane," c. 1300]

awe (v.)

"inspire with fear or dread," c. 1300, from awe (n.); Old English had egan (v.). Related: Awed; awing.

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Definitions of awe
1
awe (n.)
an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admiration;
he stared over the edge with a feeling of awe
awe (n.)
a feeling of profound respect for someone or something;
Synonyms: fear / reverence / veneration
2
awe (v.)
inspire awe in;
The famous professor awed the undergraduates
From wordnet.princeton.edu