Etymology
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aura (n.)

1870 in spiritualism, "subtle emanation around living beings;" earlier "characteristic impression" made by a personality (1859), earlier still "an aroma or subtle emanation" (1732). Also used in some mystical sense in Swedenborgian writings (by 1847). All from Latin aura "breeze, wind, the upper air," from Greek aura "breath, cool breeze, air in motion," from PIE *aur-, from root *wer- (1) "to raise, lift, hold suspended." The word was used in the classical literal sense in Middle English, "gentle breeze" (late 14c.). The modern uses all are figurative. In Latin and Greek, the metaphoric uses were in reference to changeful events, popular favor.

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Definitions of aura

aura (n.)
a sensation (as of a cold breeze or bright light) that precedes the onset of certain disorders such as a migraine attack or epileptic seizure;
aura (n.)
an indication of radiant light drawn around the head of a saint;
Synonyms: aureole / halo / nimbus / glory / gloriole
aura (n.)
a distinctive but intangible quality surrounding a person or thing;
the place had an aura of romance
Synonyms: air / atmosphere
From wordnet.princeton.edu