Etymology
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apron (n.)

"apparel for covering the front of a person" (especially while at work, to keep clothes clean), mid-15c., faulty separation (as also in adder, auger, umpire) of a napron (c. 1300), from Old French naperon "small table-cloth," diminutive of nappe "cloth," from Latin mappa "napkin." Napron was still in use late 16c. The shift of Latin -m- to -n- was a tendency in Old French (conter from computare, printemps from primum, natte "mat, matting," from matta).

The word was extended 17c. to things which resemble or function like an apron. It has been symbolic of "a wife's business" from 1610s; apron-string tenure in old law was in reference to property held in virtue of one's wife, or during her lifetime only.

Even at his age, he ought not to be always tied to his mother's apron string. [Anne Brontë, "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall," 1848]

updated on September 24, 2022

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Definitions of apron from WordNet

apron (n.)
a garment of cloth or leather or plastic that is tied about the waist and worn to protect your clothing;
apron (n.)
(golf) the part of the fairway leading onto the green;
apron (n.)
the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain);
Synonyms: proscenium / forestage
apron (n.)
a paved surface where aircraft stand while not being used;
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.