Etymology
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apprehension (n.)

late 14c., "perception, comprehension," from Old French apreension "comprehension, something learned" or directly from Latin apprehensionem (nominative apprehensio), noun of action from past-participle stem of apprehendere "take hold of, grasp" physically or mentally, from ad "to" (see ad-) + prehendere "to seize" (from prae- "before;" see pre- + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take"). Sense of "seizure on behalf of authority" is 1570s; that of "anticipation" (usually with dread), "fear of the future" is from c. 1600.

updated on August 13, 2018

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Definitions of apprehension from WordNet

apprehension (n.)
fearful expectation or anticipation;
the student looked around the examination room with apprehension
Synonyms: apprehensiveness / dread
apprehension (n.)
the cognitive condition of someone who understands;
apprehension (n.)
painful expectation;
Synonyms: misgiving
apprehension (n.)
the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal);
Synonyms: arrest / catch / collar / pinch / taking into custody
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.