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antique (adj.)

1530s, "aged, venerable;" 1540s, "having existed in ancient times," from French antique "old" (14c.), from Latin antiquus (later anticus) "ancient, former, of olden times; old, long in existence, aged; venerable; old-fashioned," from PIE *anti- "before" (from root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + *okw- "appearance" (from PIE root *okw- "to see").

Originally pronounced in English like its doublet antic, but French pronunciation and spelling were adopted in English from c. 1700. Meaning "not modern" is from 1640s. Related: Antiqueness.

antique (n.)

1520s, "a relic of antiquity," from antique (adj.). From 1771 as "an old and collectible thing."

antique (v.)

"to give an antique appearance to," 1753 (implied in antiqued, in bookbinding, "finished in an antique style"), from antique (adj.). Related: Antiquing.

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Definitions of antique from WordNet
1
antique (adj.)
out of fashion;
a suit of rather antique appearance
Synonyms: demode / ex / old-fashioned / old-hat / outmoded / passe / passee
antique (adj.)
made in or typical of earlier times and valued for its age;
the beautiful antique French furniture
antique (adj.)
belonging to or lasting from times long ago;
the antique fear that days would dwindle away to complete darkness
Synonyms: age-old
2
antique (v.)
shop for antiques;
antique (v.)
give an antique appearance to;
antique furniture
Synonyms: antiquate
3
antique (n.)
an elderly man;
Synonyms: old-timer / oldtimer / gaffer / old geezer
antique (n.)
any piece of furniture or decorative object or the like produced in a former period and valuable because of its beauty or rarity;
From wordnet.princeton.edu