Etymology
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anticipate (v.)

1530s, "to cause to happen sooner," a back-formation from anticipation, or else from Latin anticipatus, past participle of anticipare "take (care of) ahead of time," literally "taking into possession beforehand," from anti, an old form of ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."

Later "prevent or preclude by prior action" (c. 1600) and "be aware of (something) coming at a future time" (1640s). Used in the sense of "expect, look forward to" since 1749, but anticipate has an element of "prepare for, forestall" that, etymologically, should prevent its being used as a synonym for expect. Related: Anticipated; anticipating.

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Definitions of anticipate

anticipate (v.)
regard something as probable or likely;
Synonyms: expect
anticipate (v.)
act in advance of; deal with ahead of time;
Synonyms: foresee / forestall / counter
anticipate (v.)
realize beforehand;
Synonyms: previse / foreknow / foresee
anticipate (v.)
make a prediction about; tell in advance;
anticipate (v.)
be excited or anxious about;
Synonyms: look for / look to
anticipate (v.)
be a forerunner of or occur earlier than;
This composition anticipates Impressionism
From wordnet.princeton.edu