Etymology
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analogy (n.)

early 15c., "correspondence, proportion," from Old French analogie or directly from Latin analogia, from Greek analogia "proportion," from ana "upon, according to" (see ana-) + logos "ratio," also "word, speech, reckoning," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."

A mathematical term given a wider sense by Plato. Meaning "partial agreement, likeness or proportion between things" is from 1540s. In logic, "an argument from the similarity of things in some ways inferring their similarity in others," c. 1600.

updated on April 19, 2017

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Definitions of analogy from WordNet

analogy (n.)
an inference that if things agree in some respects they probably agree in others;
analogy (n.)
drawing a comparison in order to show a similarity in some respect;
the operation of a computer presents and interesting analogy to the working of the brain
the models show by analogy how matter is built up
analogy (n.)
the religious belief that between creature and creator no similarity can be found so great but that the dissimilarity is always greater; any analogy between God and humans will always be inadequate;
Synonyms: doctrine of analogy
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.