Etymology
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Words related to ana-

on (prep., adv.)

"in a position above and in contact with; in such a position as to be supported by;" also noting the goal to which some action is or has been directed; "about, concerning, regarding; in a position to cover;" as an adverb, "in or into a position in contact with and supported by the top or upper part of something; in or into place; in place for use or action; into movement or action; in operation," Old English on, unstressed variant of an "in, on, into," from Proto-Germanic *ana "on" (source also of Dutch aan, German an, Gothic ana "on, upon"), from PIE root *an- (1) "on" (source also of Avestan ana "on," Greek ana "on, upon," Latin an-, Old Church Slavonic na, Lithuanian nuo "down from").

Also used in Old English in many places where we now would use in. From 16c.-18c. (and still in northern England dialect) often reduced to o'. Phrase on to "aware" is from 1877.

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Anabaptism (n.)

name of a Christian doctrine (see Anabaptist), 1570s, from Late Latin anabaptismus, literally "a second baptism," from Ecclesiastical Greek anabaptismos, from ana "again, anew" (see ana-) + baptismos "baptism" (see baptism).

Anabaptist (n.)

class of Christians who regard infant baptism as invalid, 1530s, literally "one who baptizes over again," from Modern Latin anabaptista, from Late Latin anabaptismus "second baptism" (used in literal sense from 4c.), from Ecclesiastical Greek anabaptismos, from ana "again, anew" (see ana-) + baptismos "baptism" (see baptism).

Originally in English in reference to the sects that practiced adult baptism and arose in Germany from 1521. Probably so called because, as a new faith, they baptized converts who already had been baptized (as infants) in the older Catholic or older Protestant churches. Modern branches (notably Mennonites and Amish) baptize only once (adults) and do not actively seek converts. The name also was applied, usually opprobriously, to Baptists, perhaps due to the multiple immersions of their baptisms.

anabasis (n.)

"a military advance," 1706, from Greek anabasis "military expedition," literally "a going up (from the coast)," especially in reference to the advance of Cyrus the Younger and his Greek mercenaries from near the Aegean coast into Asia, and the subsequent story of the retreat of the 10,000 narrated by Xenophon (401 B.C.E.). From anabainein "to go up, mount;" from ana "up" (see ana-) + bainein "to go, walk, step" (from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Related: Anabatic.

anabolic (adj.)

"pertaining to the process of building up" (especially in metabolism), 1876, with -ic + Greek anabolē "that which is thrown up; a mound," from anaballein "to throw or toss up," from ana "up, upward" (see ana-) + ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach").

anachronism (n.)

1640s, "an error in computing time or finding dates," from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos, from anakhronizein "refer to wrong time," from ana "against" (see ana-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). The meaning "something out of harmony with a specified time" is recorded by 1816.

Anacreontic (adj.)

"of or in the manner of Anacreon," the "convivial bard of Greece," celebrated lyrical poet (560-478 B.C.E.), born at Teos in Ionia. Also in reference to his lyric form (1706) of a four-line stanza, rhymed alternately, each line with four beats (three trochees and a long syllable), also "convivial and amatory" (1801); and "an erotic poem celebrating love and wine" (1650s).

The name is literally "Up-lord," from ana "up" (see ana-) + kreon "lord, master," which Beekes calls "an inherited word from Indo-European poetic language," from PIE *kreih- "splendor," and he compares Sanskrit sri- "magnificence, riches, splendor, fame."

U.S. lawyer and writer Francis Scott Key (1779-1843) in 1814 set or wrote his poem "The Star-Spangled Banner" to the melody of the drinking song of the popular London gentleman's club called The Anacreontic Society, dedicated to "wit, harmony, and the god of wine." The tune is late 18c. and may be the work of society member and court musician John Stafford Smith (1750-1836).

anacrusis (n.)

"unstressed syllable at the beginning of a verse," 1833, Latinized from Greek anakrousis "a pushing back," of a ship, "backing water," from anakrouein "to push back, stop short, check," from ana "back" (see ana-) + krouein "to strike," from PIE *kreue- (2) "to push, strike" (source also of Russian krusit, Lithuanian krušu, krušti "to smash, shatter," Old Church Slavonic kruchu "piece, bit of food," Old English hreowian "feel pain or sorrow," Old Norse hryggja "make sad"). Related: Anacrustic.

anadiplosis (n.)

in rhetoric, "repetition at the start of a line or phrase of the last word or words of the preceding one," 1580s, from Latin, from Greek anadiplosis, from anadiploesthai "to be doubled back, to be made double," from ana "back" (see ana-) + diploun "to double, fold over" (see diploma).

Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering. [Yoda, "Star Wars"]
anadromous (adj.)

"ascending," especially "ascending a river to spawn" (as salmon and other fishes do), 1753, from Latinized form of Greek anadromos "running upward," from ana "up, upward" (see ana-) + dromos "a running," from dramein "to run" (see dromedary).