Etymology
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Words related to amble

*ambhi- 
also *mbhi-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "around;" probably derived from *ant-bhi "from both sides," from root *ant- "front, forehead."

It forms all or part of: abaft; about; alley (n.1) "open passage between buildings;" ambagious; ambassador; ambi-; ambidexterity; ambidextrous; ambience; ambient; ambiguous; ambit; ambition; ambitious; amble; ambulance; ambulant; ambulate; ambulation; ambulatory; amphi-; amphibian; Amphictyonic; amphisbaena; Amphiscians; amphitheater; amphora; amputate; amputation; ancillary; andante; anfractuous; be-; begin; beleaguer; between; bivouac; but; by; circumambulate; embassy; ember-days; funambulist; ombudsman; perambulate; perambulation; preamble; somnambulate; somnambulism; umlaut.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit abhitah "on both sides," abhi "toward, to;" Avestan aibi; Greek amphi "round about;" Latin ambi- "around, round about;" Gaulish ambi-, Old Irish imb- "round about, about;" Old Church Slavonic oba; Lithuanian abu "both;" Old English ymbe, German um "around."
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alley (n.1)

mid-14c., "passage in a house; open passage between buildings; walkway in a garden," from Old French alee (13c., Modern French allée) "a path, passage, way, corridor," also "a going," from fem. of ale, past participle of aler "to go," which is of uncertain origin. It might be a contraction of Latin ambulare "to walk" (Watkins, see amble (v.)), or it might be from Gallo-Roman allari, a back-formation from Latin allatus "having been brought to" [Barnhart]. Compare sense evolution of gate.

Applied by c. 1500 to "long narrow enclosure for playing at bowls, skittles, etc." Used in place names from c. 1500. "In U.S. applied to what in London is called a Mews" [OED], and in American English especially of a back-lane parallel to a main street (1729). To be up someone's alley "in someone's neighborhood" (literally or figuratively) is from 1931; alley-cat (n.) is attested by 1890.

ambler (n.)

"a horse which ambles; a person who ambles," late 14c., agent noun from amble (v.).

ambulance (n.)

1798, "mobile or field hospital," from French ambulance, formerly (hôpital) ambulant (17c.), literally "walking (hospital)," from Latin ambulantem (nominative ambulans), present participle of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble).

AMBULANCE, s. f. a moveable hospital. These were houses constructed in a manner so as to be taken to pieces, and carried from place to place, according to the movements of the army; and served as receptacles in which the sick and wounded men might be received and attended. ["Lexicographica-Neologica Gallica" (The Neological French Dictionary), William Dupré, London, 1801]

The word was not common in English until the meaning transferred from "field hospital" to "vehicle for conveying wounded from the field" (1854) during the Crimean War. Extended early 20c. to vehicles to transport the sick or wounded in civilian life. In late 19c. U.S. the same word was used dialectally to mean "prairie wagon." Ambulance-chaser as a contemptuous term for a type of lawyer dates from 1897.

ambulant (adj.)
1610s, "walking, moving from place to place," from Latin ambulantem (nominative ambulans), present participle of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Of diseases, denoting cases in which the patient may be up and around, by 1913.
ambulate (v.)
"to walk, move about," 1620s, from Latin ambulatus, past participle of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Ambulated; ambulating.
ambulation (n.)

"act of walking about," 1570s, from Latin ambulationem (nominative ambulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). The word was used earlier in reference to the spread of disease (1540s).

ambulatory (adj.)
1620s, "pertaining to walking;" also "movable; shifting, not permanent," from Latin ambulatorius "pertaining to a walker; movable," from ambulator, agent noun from past participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Middle English had ambulary "movable" (mid-15c.). Related: Ambulatorial.
ambulatory (n.)
"part of a building intended for walking," 1620s, from Medieval Latin ambulatorium, from Latin ambulatorius "movable, of or pertaining to a walker," from ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)).
circumambulate (v.)

"to walk round or about," 1650s, from Latin circumambulatus, past participle of circumambulare "to walk around," from circum "around" (see circum-) + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Circumambulated; circumambulating; circumambulation.