Etymology
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amble (v.)

"to move easily and gently without hard shocks," as a horse does when it first lifts the two legs on one side and then the two on the other, early 14c., from Old French ambler, of a horse or other quadruped, "go at a steady, easy pace" (12c.), from Latin ambulare "to walk, to go about, take a walk," perhaps a compound of ambi- "around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") and -ulare, from PIE root *el- "to go" (source also of Greek ale "wandering," alaomai "wander about;" Latvian aluot "go around or astray"). Until 1590s used only of horses or persons on horseback. Related: Ambled; ambling.

amble (n.)

"an easy walking gait (of a horse), the gait of a horse when both legs on one side are in motion at the same time," from Old French, from ambler (see amble (v.)). Of persons from c. 1600.

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Definitions of amble
1
amble (v.)
walk leisurely;
Synonyms: mosey
2
amble (n.)
a leisurely walk (usually in some public place);
From wordnet.princeton.edu