Etymology
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ambidextrous (adj.)

also ambidexterous, "able to use both hands equally," 1640s, with -ous + Medieval Latin ambidexter, literally "right-handed on both sides," from ambi- "both, on both sides" (see ambi-) + dexter "right-handed" (from PIE root *deks- "right; south"). An earlier English use of ambidexter (adj.) meant "double-dealer, one who takes both sides in a conflict" (late 14c.).

Its opposite, ambilevous "left-handed on both sides," hence "clumsy" (1640s) is rare. Ambidexter as a noun is attested from 1530s (in the sense "one who takes bribes from both sides") and is the earliest form of the word in English; its sense of "one who uses both hands equally well" appears by 1590s.

updated on February 04, 2018

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Definitions of ambidextrous from WordNet

ambidextrous (adj.)
equally skillful with each hand;
an ambidextrous surgeon
Synonyms: two-handed
ambidextrous (adj.)
marked by deliberate deceptiveness especially by pretending one set of feelings and acting under the influence of another; "she was a deceitful scheming little thing"- Israel Zangwill; "a double-faced infernal traitor and schemer"- W.M.Thackeray;
Synonyms: deceitful / double-dealing / duplicitous / Janus-faced / two-faced / double-faced / double-tongued
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.