Etymology
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altogether (adv.)

"wholly, entirely, completely," early 13c., altogedere, a strengthened form of all (also see together); used in the sense of "a whole" from 1660s. OED notes, "There is a common tendency to write altogether where all together is logically preferable," and gives examples from 1765. The altogether "a condition of nakedness" is from 1894, probably from the notion of "completely" naked.

updated on September 18, 2022

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