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agree (v.)

late 14c., "to give consent, assent," from Old French agreer "to please, satisfy; to receive with favor, take pleasure in" (12c.), a contraction of phrase a gré "favorably, of good will," literally "to (one's) liking" (or a like contraction in Medieval Latin) from a, from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + Old French gre, gret "that which pleases," from Latin gratum, neuter of gratus "pleasing, welcome, agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

In Middle English also "to please, gratify, satisfy," a sense preserved in agreeable. Of parties, "come to agreement; make a settlement," mid-15c.; meaning "to be in harmony in opinions" is from late 15c. Of things, "to coincide," from 1520s. To agree to differ is from 1785 (also agree to disagree, 1792). Related: Agreed; agreeing.

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Definitions of agree from WordNet

agree (v.)
be in accord; be in agreement;
I can't agree with you!
We agreed on the terms of the settlement
Synonyms: hold / concur / concord
agree (v.)
consent or assent to a condition, or agree to do something;
He agreed to leave her alone
She agreed to all my conditions
agree (v.)
be compatible, similar or consistent; coincide in their characteristics;
The two stories don't agree in many details
Synonyms: match / fit / correspond / check / jibe / gibe / tally
agree (v.)
go together;
Synonyms: harmonize / harmonise / consort / accord / concord / fit in
agree (v.)
show grammatical agreement;
Subjects and verbs must always agree in English
agree (v.)
be agreeable or suitable;
White wine doesn't agree with me
agree (v.)
achieve harmony of opinion, feeling, or purpose;
No two of my colleagues would agree on whom to elect chairman
From wordnet.princeton.edu