Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to affected

affect (v.2)
"to make a pretense of," 1660s, earlier "to assume the character of (someone)," 1590s; originally in English in a now-obsolete sense "aim at, aspire to, desire" (early 15c.), from Old French afecter (15c.), later affecter, from Latin affectare "to strive after, aim at, aspire to," frequentative of afficere (past participle affectus) "to do something to, act on, influence" (see affect (n.)). Related: Affected; affecting.
Advertisement
disaffected (adj.)

"estranged, hostile, having the affections alienated," usually in reference to one displeased with the actions of an authority or a party, "disloyal," 1630s, past-participle adjective from disaffect. Related: Disaffectedly; disaffectedness.

affect (v.1)
"to make a mental impression on," 1630s; earlier "to attack" (c. 1600), "act upon, infect" (early 15c.), from affect (n.) or from Latin affectus "disposition, mood, state of mind or body produced by some external influence." Related: Affected; affecting. "The two verbs, with their derivatives, run into each other, and cannot be completely separated" [Century Dictionary].
effected (adj.)
"brought about," past-participle adjective from effect (v.). Since early 15c. sometimes used erroneously for affected.