Etymology
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adaptation (n.)

c. 1600, "action of adapting (something to something else)," from French adaptation, from Late Latin adaptationem (nominative adaptatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of adaptare "to adjust," from ad "to" (see ad-) + aptare "to join," from aptus "fitted" (see apt).

The meaning "condition of being adapted, state of being fitted to circumstances or relations" is from 1670s. The sense of "modification of a thing to suit new conditions" is from 1790. The biological sense of "variations in a living thing to suit changed conditions" is by 1859, in Darwin's writings.

Origin and meaning of adaptation

updated on September 14, 2022

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Definitions of adaptation from WordNet

adaptation (n.)
a written work (as a novel) that has been recast in a new form;
the play is an adaptation of a short novel
Synonyms: version
adaptation (n.)
the process of adapting to something (such as environmental conditions);
Synonyms: adaption / adjustment
adaptation (n.)
(physiology) the responsive adjustment of a sense organ (as the eye) to varying conditions (as of light);
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.