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absurd (adj.)

"plainly illogical," 1550s, from French absurde (16c.), from Latin absurdus "out of tune, discordant;" figuratively "incongruous, foolish, silly, senseless," from ab- "off, away from," here perhaps an intensive prefix, + surdus "dull, deaf, mute," which is possibly from an imitative PIE root meaning "to buzz, whisper" (see susurration). Thus the basic sense is perhaps "out of tune," but de Vaan writes, "Since 'deaf' often has two semantic sides, viz. 'who cannot hear' and 'who is not heard,' ab-surdus can be explained as 'which is unheard of' ..." The modern English sense is the Latin figurative one, perhaps "out of harmony with reason or propriety." Related: Absurdly; absurdness.

Origin and meaning of absurd

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Definitions of absurd from WordNet
1
absurd (adj.)
inconsistent with reason or logic or common sense; "the absurd predicament of seeming to argue that virtue is highly desirable but intensely unpleasant"- Walter Lippman;
absurd (adj.)
so unreasonable as to invite derision;
the absurd excuse that the dog ate his homework
2
absurd (n.)
a situation in which life seems irrational and meaningless; "The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth"--Albert Camus;
Synonyms: the absurd
From wordnet.princeton.edu