Etymology
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ablative (n.)

"grammatical case denoting removal or separation," late 14c. as an adjective; mid-15c. as a noun (short for ablative case, originally of Latin), from Old French ablatif and directly from Latin (casus) ablativus "(case) of removal," expressing direction from a place or time, coined by Julius Caesar from ablatus "taken away," past participle of auferre "to carry off or away, withdraw, remove," from ab "off, away" (see ab-) + the irregular verb ferre (past participle latum; see oblate) "to carry, to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."). The "from" case, the Latin case of adverbial relation, typically expressing removal or separation, also "source or place of an action." Related: Ablatival.

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Definitions of ablative
1
ablative (adj.)
relating to the ablative case;
ablative (adj.)
tending to ablate; i.e. to be removed or vaporized at very high temperature;
ablative material on a rocket cone
2
ablative (n.)
the case indicating the agent in passive sentences or the instrument or manner or place of the action described by the verb;
Synonyms: ablative case
From wordnet.princeton.edu