Advertisement

abduction (n.)

1620s, "a leading away," from Latin abductionem (nominative abductio) "a forcible carrying off, ravishing, robbing," noun of action from past-participle stem of abducere "to lead away, take away, arrest" (often by force), from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). As "criminal act of forcibly taking (someone)" by 1768; before that the word also was a term in surgery and logic. In the Mercian hymns, Latin abductione is glossed by Old English wiðlaednisse.

Origin and meaning of abduction

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of abduction from WordNet

abduction (n.)
the criminal act of capturing and carrying away by force a family member; if a man's wife is abducted it is a crime against the family relationship and against the wife;
abduction (n.)
(physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the body;
From wordnet.princeton.edu