Etymology
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verbal (adj.)

early 15c., "dealing with words" (especially in contrast to things or realities), from Old French verbal (14c.) and directly from Late Latin verbalis "consisting of words, relating to verbs," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb). Related: Verbally. Verbal conditioning is recorded from 1954. Colloquial verbal diarrhea is recorded from 1823. A verbal noun is a noun derived from a verb and sharing in its senses and constructions.

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Definitions of verbal

verbal (adj.)
communicated in the form of words;
a verbal protest
verbal imagery
verbal (adj.)
of or relating to or formed from words in general;
verbal ability
verbal (adj.)
of or relating to or formed from a verb;
verbal adjectives like `running' in `hot and cold running water'
verbal (adj.)
relating to or having facility in the use of words;
verbal aptitude
a merely verbal writer who sacrifices content to sound
a good poet is a verbal artist
verbal (adj.)
expressed in spoken words;
a verbal contract
verbal (adj.)
prolix; "you put me to forget a lady's manners by being so verbal"- Shakespeare;
From wordnet.princeton.edu