Etymology
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U

for historical evolution, see V. Used punningly for you by 1588 ["Love's Labour's Lost," V.i.60], not long after the pronunciation shift that made the vowel a homonym of the pronoun. As a simple shorthand (without intentional word-play), it is recorded from 1862. Common in business abbreviations since 1923 (such as U-Haul, attested from 1951).

The substitution of Middle English -o- for Old English -u- before -m-, -n-, or -r- was a French scribal habit before minims to avoid misreading the letters in the old style handwriting, which jammed them together. The practice transformed some, come, monk, tongue, worm.

updated on March 13, 2022

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Definitions of U from WordNet

u (n.)
a base containing nitrogen that is found in RNA (but not in DNA) and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with adenine;
Synonyms: uracil
u (n.)
a heavy toxic silvery-white radioactive metallic element; occurs in many isotopes; used for nuclear fuels and nuclear weapons;
Synonyms: uranium / atomic number "
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.