Advertisement

Phoenician (n.)

late 14c., phenicienes (plural), "native or inhabitant of the ancient country of Phoenicia" on the coast of Syria, from Old French phenicien or formed from Latin Phoenice, Phoenices, on the model of Persian, etc. The Latin word is from Greek Phoinike "Phoenicia" (including its colony Carthage), which is perhaps of Pre-Greek origin [Beekes].

Compare phoenix, which seems to be unrelated. Greek phoinix also meant "(the color) purple," perhaps "the Phoenician color," because the Greeks obtained purple dyes from the Phoenicians, but scholars disagree about this (Greek also had phoinos "red, blood red," which is of uncertain etymology). Greek phoinix was also "palm-tree," especially "the date," fruit and tree, probably literally "the Phoenician (tree)," because the palm originated in the East and the Greeks traded with the Phoenicians for dates. It also was the name of a stringed instrument, probably also a reference to a Phoenician origin.

In reference to the Semitic language spoken by the people, from 1836; as an adjective, from c. 1600.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of Phoenician
1
Phoenician (n.)
a member of an ancient Semitic people who dominated trade in the first millennium B.C.;
Phoenician (n.)
the extinct language of an ancient Semitic people who dominated trade in the ancient world;
2
Phoenician (adj.)
of or relating to or characteristic of Phoenicia or its inhabitants;
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near Phoenician

Phocaea

Phocis

phoebe

Phoebe

Phoebus

Phoenician

phoenix

phone

-phone

phoneme

phonemic