Etymology
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morocco (n.)

"kind of fine flexible leather," 1630s, earlier maroquin (16c.), via French; ultimately from Morocco, the country in northwest Africa, where the sumac-tanned goatskin leather first was made. Valued for its firmness of texture, flexibility, and grained surface, it was used to make durable book-bindings, for upholstering seats, and somewhat in shoe-making.

Morocco

country in northwest Africa, from Italian, from Berber Marrakesh (properly the name of the city of Marrakesh), from Arabic Maghrib-al-Aqsa "Extreme West." Compare French Maroc, German Marokko. In English, the first vowel has been altered, apparently by influence of Moor. Related: Moroccan.

updated on February 23, 2019

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Definitions of morocco from WordNet
1
morocco (n.)
a soft pebble-grained leather made from goatskin; used for shoes and book bindings etc.;
2
Morocco (n.)
a kingdom (constitutional monarchy) in northwestern Africa with a largely Muslim population; achieved independence from France in 1956;
Synonyms: Kingdom of Morocco / Maroc / Marruecos / Al-Magrib
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.