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horn (n.)

Old English horn "horn of an animal; projection, pinnacle," also "wind instrument" (originally one made from animal horns), from Proto-Germanic *hurni- (source also of German Horn, Dutch horen, Old Frisian horn, Gothic haurn), from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

Late 14c. as "one of the tips of the crescent moon." The name was retained for a class of musical instruments that developed from the hunting horn; the French horn is the true representative of the class. Of dilemmas from 1540s; of automobile warning signals from 1901. Slang meaning "erect penis" is suggested by c. 1600. Jazz slang sense of "trumpet" is by 1921. Meaning "telephone" is by 1945. Figurative senses of Latin cornu included "salient point, chief argument; wing, flank; power, courage, strength." Horn of plenty is from 1580s. To make horns at "hold up the fist with the two exterior fingers extended" as a gesture of insult is from c.1600.

Symbolic of cuckoldry since mid-15c. (the victim was fancied to grow one on his head). The image is widespread in Europe and perhaps as old as ancient Greece. The German linguist Hermann Dunger ('Hörner Aufsetzen' und 'Hahnrei', "Germania" 29, 1884) ascribes it to a custom surviving into 19c., "the old practice of engrafting the spurs of a castrated cock on the root of the excised comb, which caused them to grow like horns" [James Hastings, "Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics"] but the image could have grown as well from a general gesture of contempt or insult made to wronged husbands, "who have been the subject of popular jest in all ages" [Hastings].

horn (v.)

1690s, "to furnish with horns," from horn (n.). Earlier in figurative sense of "to cuckold" (1540s). Meaning "to push with the horns" (of cattle, buffalo, etc.) is from 1851, American English; phrase horn in "intrude" is by 1880, American English, originally cowboy slang. Related: Horned; horning.

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Definitions of horn from WordNet
1
horn (n.)
a noisemaker (as at parties or games) that makes a loud noise when you blow through it;
horn (n.)
one of the bony outgrowths on the heads of certain ungulates;
horn (n.)
a noise made by the driver of an automobile to give warning;
horn (n.)
a high pommel of a Western saddle (usually metal covered with leather);
Synonyms: saddle horn
horn (n.)
a brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone; has a narrow tube and a flared bell and is played by means of valves;
Synonyms: cornet / trumpet / trump
horn (n.)
any hard protuberance from the head of an organism that is similar to or suggestive of a horn;
horn (n.)
the material (mostly keratin) that covers the horns of ungulates and forms hooves and claws and nails;
horn (n.)
a device having the shape of a horn;
the horn of an anvil
horns at the ends of a new moon
the cleat had two horns
horn (n.)
an alarm device that makes a loud warning sound;
horn (n.)
a brass musical instrument consisting of a conical tube that is coiled into a spiral and played by means of valves;
Synonyms: French horn
horn (n.)
a device on an automobile for making a warning noise;
Synonyms: automobile horn / car horn / motor horn / hooter
2
horn (v.)
stab or pierce with a horn or tusk;
the rhino horned the explorer
Synonyms: tusk
From wordnet.princeton.edu