Etymology
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Words related to Edge

egg (v.)

"to incite, urge, encourage, instigate," c. 1200, from Old Norse eggja "to goad on, incite," from egg "edge" (see edge (n.)). The unrelated verb from egg (n.) is by 1808 in cookery, "to cover or mix with eggs;" the meaning "to pelt with (rotten) eggs" is from 1857. Related: Egged; egging.

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*ak- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce."

It forms all or part of: acacia; acanthus; accipiter; acer; acerbic; acerbity; acervate; acervulus; acescent; acetic; acid; acicular; acme; acne; acrid; acridity; acrimony; acro-; acrobat; acromegaly; acronym; acrophobia; acropolis; acrostic; acrylic; acuity; aculeate; acumen; acupressure; acupuncture; acute; aglet; ague; Akron; anoxic; awn; coelacanth; dioxin; deoxy-; eager; ear (n.2) "grain part of corn;" edge (n.); egg (v.) "to goad on, incite;" eglantine; epoxy; ester; exacerbation; hammer; hypoxia; mediocre; oxalic; oxide; oxy-; oxygen; oxymoron; paragon; pyracanth; paroxysm; selvage; vinegar.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek akros "at the end, at the top, outermost; consummate, excellent," akis "sharp point," akros "at the farthest point, highest, outermost," akantha "thorn," akme "summit, edge," oxys "sharp, bitter;" Sanskrit acri- "corner, edge," acani- "point of an arrow," asrih "edge;" Oscan akrid (ablative singular) "sharply;" Latin acer (fem. acris) "sharp to the senses, pungent, bitter, eager, fierce," acutus "sharp, pointed," acuere "to sharpen," acerbus "harsh, bitter," acere "be sharp, be bitter," acus "a needle, pin," ocris "jagged mountain;" Lithuanian ašmuo "sharpness," akstis "sharp stick;" Old Lithuanian aštras, Lithuanian aštrus "sharp;" Old Church Slavonic ostru, Russian óstryj "sharp;" Old Irish er "high;" Welsh ochr "edge, corner, border;" Old Norse eggja "goad;" Old English ecg "sword;" German Eck "corner."
edged (adj.)
1590s, "having a sharp edge;" 1690s, "having a hem or border," past-participle adjective from edge (v.).
edgeways (adv.)

also edge-ways, "with the edge turned forward or toward a particular point," 1560s, from edge (n.) + way (n.). First attested form of the word is edgewaie; the adverbial genitive -s appears by 1640s. Edgewise (1715) appears to be a variant, based on otherwise, etc. See edge (v.).

As if it were possible for any of us to slide in a word edgewise! [Mary Mitford, "Our Village," 1824].

To edge in a word in this sense is from 1680s.

edging (n.)
1570s, "the putting of a border," verbal noun from edge (v.). Meaning "a border, that which is added to form an edge" is from 1660s; that of "the trimming of lawn edges" is from 1858.
double-edged (adj.)

"cutting or working both ways," especially figurative, of arguments, etc., "making both for and against the one using it," 1550s; see double (adj.) + edge (n.).

edgy (adj.)
"having sharp edges," 1755, from edge (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "tense and irritable" is attested by 1837, perhaps from notion of being on the edge, at the point of doing something irrational (a figurative use attested from c. 1600). Related: Edgily; edginess.
Egbert 
masc. proper name, from Old English Ecg-beorht, literally "sword-bright." See edge (n.) + bright (adj.).
selvage (n.)
mid-15c., "edge of web or cloth so finished as to prevent raveling," apparently literally "its own edge," a corruption of self + edge (n.); on analogy of Middle Flemish selvegge (compare also Low German sulfegge; Dutch zelfkant, from kant "border;" Middle High German selbende, German Selbend, literally "self-end").
straight-edge (n.)
1812, "bar for drawing or measuring straight lines," from straight (adj.1) + edge (n.). As the name of a punk subculture, attested by 1987, probably suggested by straight (adj.2).