Etymology
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Constantine

masc. proper name, Latin Constantinus, from constans "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare "to stand together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." With the common name-forming suffix -inus (see -ine (1)).

updated on March 10, 2018

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Definitions of Constantine from WordNet

Constantine (n.)
Emperor of Rome who stopped the persecution of Christians and in 324 made Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire; in 330 he moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium and renamed it Constantinople (280-337);
Synonyms: Constantine I / Constantine the Great / Flavius Valerius Constantinus
Constantine (n.)
a walled city in northeastern Algeria to the east of Algiers; was destroyed in warfare in the 4th century and rebuilt by Constantine I;
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.