Etymology
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book (n.)

Old English boc "book, writing, written document," generally referred (despite phonetic difficulties) to Proto-Germanic *bōk(ō)-, from *bokiz "beech" (source also of German Buch "book" Buche "beech;" see beech), the notion being of beechwood tablets on which runes were inscribed; but it may be from the tree itself (people still carve initials in them).

Latin and Sanskrit also have words for "writing" that are based on tree names ("birch" and "ash," respectively). And compare French livre "book," from Latin librum, originally "the inner bark of trees" (see library). The Old English word originally meant any written document. The sense gradually narrowed by early Middle English to "a written work covering many pages fastened together and bound," also "a literary composition" in any form, of however many volumes. Later also "bound pages," whether written on or not. In 19c. it also could mean "a magazine;" in 20c. a telephone directory.

From c. 1200 as "a main subdivision of a larger work." Meaning "libretto of an opera" is from 1768. A betting book "record of bets made" is from 1812. Meaning "sum of criminal charges" is from 1926, hence slang phrase throw the book at (1932). Book of Life "the roll of those chosen for eternal life" is from mid-14c. Book of the month is from 1926. To do something by the book "according to the rules" is from 1590s.

The use of books or written charters was introduced in Anglo-Saxon times by the ecclesiastics, as affording more permanent and satisfactory evidence of a grant or conveyance of land than the symbolical or actual delivery of possession before witnesses, which was the method then in vogue. [Century Dictionary]

Origin and meaning of book

book (v.)

Old English bocian "to grant or assign by charter," from book (n.). Meaning "to enter into a book, record" is early 13c. Meaning "to register a name for a seat or place; issue (railway) tickets" is from 1841; "to engage a performer as a guest" is from 1872. U.S. student slang meaning "to depart hastily, go fast" is by 1977, of uncertain signification. Related: Booked; booking.

Origin and meaning of book

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Definitions of book
1
book (n.)
a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together);
I am reading a good book on economics
book (n.)
physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together;
he used a large book as a doorstop
Synonyms: volume
book (n.)
a compilation of the known facts regarding something or someone;
his name is in all the record books
Synonyms: record / record book
book (n.)
a written version of a play or other dramatic composition; used in preparing for a performance;
Synonyms: script / playscript
book (n.)
a record in which commercial accounts are recorded;
they got a subpoena to examine our books
Synonyms: ledger / leger / account book / book of account
book (n.)
a collection of playing cards satisfying the rules of a card game;
book (n.)
a collection of rules or prescribed standards on the basis of which decisions are made;
they run things by the book around here
Synonyms: rule book
book (n.)
a major division of a long written composition;
the book of Isaiah
book (n.)
a number of sheets (ticket or stamps etc.) bound together on one edge;
he bought a book of stamps
2
book (v.)
engage for a performance;
Her agent had booked her for several concerts in Tokyo
book (v.)
arrange for and reserve (something for someone else) in advance;
The agent booked tickets to the show for the whole family
Synonyms: reserve / hold
book (v.)
record a charge in a police register;
The policeman booked her when she tried to solicit a man
book (v.)
register in a hotel booker;
3
Book (n.)
the sacred writings of Islam revealed by God to the prophet Muhammad during his life at Mecca and Medina;
Synonyms: Koran / Quran / al-Qur'an
Book (n.)
the sacred writings of the Christian religions;
Synonyms: Bible / Christian Bible / Good Book / Holy Scripture / Holy Writ / Scripture / Word of God / Word
From wordnet.princeton.edu