Etymology
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Words related to Bolshevik

Bolo (n.)
"traitor," 1917, from Paul Bolo, French adventurer shot for treason April 17, 1918; used in World War I with reference to pacifist propagandists; later somewhat assimilated to Bolshevik (q.v.).
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debilitate (v.)

"weaken, impair the strength of, enfeeble, make inactive or languid," 1530s, from Latin debilitatus, past participle of debilitare "to weaken," from debilis "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel- "strong" (see Bolshevik). Related: Debilitated; debilitating.

debilitation (n.)

early 15c., debilitacioun, "physical weakness, state of being enfeebled," from French débilitation (13c.) and directly from Latin debilitationem (nominative debilitatio) "a laming, crippling, weakening," noun of action from past-participle stem of debilitare "to weaken," from debilis "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel- "strong" (see Bolshevik). From 1520s as "action of rendering weak."

debilitative (adj.)

"tending to render weak or infirm," 1680s, with -ive + Latin debilitat-, stem of debilis "lame, disabled, crippled," figuratively "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel-"strong" (see Bolshevik). 

debility (n.)

"state or condition of being weak or feeble, lack of strength or vigor," early 15c., from Old French debilite (Modern French débilité) or directly from Latin debilitatem (nominative debilitas) "a laming, crippling, weakening," from debilis "lame, disabled, crippled," figuratively "weak, helpless," from de "from, away" (see de-) + -bilis "strength," from PIE root *bel- "strong" (see Bolshevik).

Menshevik (adj.)

1907, from Russian men'shevik, from men'she "lesser" (comparative of malo "little," from PIE root *mei- (2) "small") + -evik "one that is." So called by Lenin because they were a minority in the party. The Russian word was used earlier in reference to the minority faction of the Social-Democratic Party when it split in 1903. See Bolshevik. As a noun from 1917. Russian plural mensheviki occasionally was used in English. Related: Menshevism; Menshevist.