Etymology
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Words related to Bob

bobby pin (n.)
1928, from diminutive of bob (n.2) + pin (n.).
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bobby sox (n.)

also bobby socks, 1943, from diminutive of bob (n.2) + sox. So called because they are "shortened" compared to knee-socks. Derivative bobby-soxer "adolescent girl," especially with reference to fans of popular crooners, first attested 1944.

Months ago colored bobby sox folded at the top were decreed, not by anyone or any group but, as usual, by a sudden mysterious and universal acceptance of the new idea. Now no teen-ager dares wear anything but pure white socks without a fold. [Life magazine, Dec. 11, 1944]
bobsled (n.)
also bob-sled, 1839, originally used for hauling timber, from bob (n.2) + sled (n.). So called because it is a short type, or because its body rested on short bobs, one behind the other.
bobcat (n.)
North American lynx, 1873, in a Maine context; so called for its short tail; see bob (n.2) + cat (n.).
Robert 

masc. proper name, from an Old North French form of Old High German Hrodberht "bright-fame, bright with glory," from hrod- "fame, glory" (from Proto-Germanic *hrothi-), + *berht "bright" (from PIE root *bhereg- "to shine; bright, white"). Never a king's name, though it was the name of William the Conqueror's rebellious oldest son. "It was introduced by Normans during the reign of Edward the Confessor and became very popular" ["Dictionary of English Surnames"].

In Middle English, from mid-13c., also "a designation for a robber, vagabond, or lowly person" ["Middle English Compendium"]; hence Robertes men "robbers, marauders;" Robert-renne-aboute "a wastrel, a good-for-nothing."

bobtail (n.)
also bob-tail, c. 1600, "tail of a horse cut short," from bob (n.2) + tail (n.). Related: Bobtailed.
bobble (v.)
1812, frequentative of bob (v.1). The notion is "to move or handle something with continual bobbing." Related: Bobbled; bobbling. Bobble-head as a type of doll with a spring-mounted head is from 1968.
plumb-bob (n.)

"conoid-shaped metal weight attached to the end of a plumb-line," 1835, from plumb (n.) + bob (n.1).