Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to -ness

-tude 
syllable formed when the word-forming element -ude, making abstract nouns from adjectives and participles, is fixed to a base or to another suffix ending in -t or -te; from French -ude, from Latin -udo (stem -udin-). The equivalent of native -ness.
Advertisement
absoluteness (n.)
1560s, "perfection," a sense now obsolete, from absolute (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "unlimited rule" is from 1610s; that of "unconditional quality" is from 1650s.
activeness (n.)

"quality of being active, activity," c. 1600, from active + -ness.

alertness (n.)

"state or quality of being alert," 1714, from alert (adj.) + -ness.

aliveness (n.)

"life, vigor, state or condition of being alive," 1853, from alive + -ness.

amenableness (n.)

"liability to answer, disposition to respond to," 1830, from amenable + -ness.

Americanness (n.)

"American quality, origination, or nature," 1860, from American (adj.) + -ness.

Our legislator took to Congress several securities against erroneous action, several securities of largeness, liberality, American-ness, if I may be suffered thus to coin a word. [Robert B. Warden, "Life and Character of Stephen Arnold Douglas," Columbus, 1860]
apartness (n.)

"state of being apart," 1849, from apart + -ness.

aptness (n.)

"state or quality of being apt" in any sense, 1530s, from apt + -ness.

assertiveness (n.)
"tendency toward self-assertion," 1867, short for self-assertiveness (1855); see assertive + -ness.