Etymology
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Words related to -itis

encephalitis (n.)
"inflammation of the brain," 1843, from encephalo- "the brain" + -itis "inflammation." Related: Encephalitic.
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enteritis (n.)
"acute inflammation of the bowels," 1808, medical Latin, coined c. 1750 by French pathologist François-Boissier de la Croix de Sauvages (1706-1767), from enteron "intestine" (see enteric) + -itis "inflammation."
fasciitis (n.)
1893, from fascia + -itis "inflammation."
frenetic (adj.)

late 14c., frenetik, "temporarily deranged, delirious, crazed," from Old French frenetike "mad, crazy" (13c.), from Latin phreneticus "delirious," alteration of Greek phrenitikos, from phrenitis (nosos) "frenzy, mental disease, insanity," literally "inflammation of the brain," from phrēn "mind, reason," also "diaphragm" (see phreno-) + -itis "inflammation." The classical ph- sometimes was restored from mid-16c. (see phrenetic). Related: Frenetical; frenetically. Compare frantic.

gastritis (n.)
1806, medical Latin, from gastro- "stomach" + -itis "inflammation." Coined by French pathologist François-Boissier de la Croix de Sauvages (1706-1767).
gingivitis (n.)
1874, from Latin gingivae "the gums" (of unknown origin) + -itis "inflammation."
hepatitis (n.)

1727, from Greek hēpatos, genitive of hepar "liver," from PIE root *yekwr- (source also of Sanskrit yakrt, Avestan yakar, Persian jigar, Latin jecur, Old Lithuanian jeknos "liver") + -itis "inflammation."

laryngitis (n.)
"inflammation of the larynx," 1818, Medical Latin, from combining form of larynx (q.v.) + -itis "inflammation." Related: Laryngitic (1847).
localitis (n.)
"obsession with the problems of one's locality and consequent failure to see big pictures," 1943, U.S. World War II jargon, originally of military strategists, from local (adj.) + transferred use of medical suffix -itis.
mastitis (n.)

"inflammation of the mammary gland," 1842, medical Latin, from masto- "female breast" + -itis "inflammation."

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