Etymology
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Words related to -ian

Ethiopian (n.)
1550s; see Ethiop + -ian. As an adjective from 1680s; earlier adjective was Ethiopic (1650s).
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Frobelian 
in reference to kindergarten, 1873 in English, from name of German philosopher and education reformer Friedrich Fröbel (1782-1852) + -ian.
Grecian (adj.)
c. 1400, from Old French Grecien, from Latin Graecia "Greece" (see Greek (n.)) + people ending -ian. The noun meaning "a Greek" is from early 15c.
Hibernian 
1630s (adj.), 1709 (n.), "Irish;" see Hibernia + -ian. Related: Hibernianism.
-iana 
form of -ana (q.v.) with nouns whose adjectival forms end in -ian.
Iranian (adj.)
1788, "of or pertaining to (ancient) Persia," from Iran + -ian. From 1839 in reference to the language. As a noun, "an inhabitant of Persia" (1792), later "the language of Persia" (1850). Iranic (adj.) is from 1847.
Jovian (adj.)
1520s, "of Jove," from Late Latin Iovianus, from Latin Iovis (see Jove) + -ian. Meaning "of the planet Jupiter" is recorded from 1794. Classical Latin Iovianus was a masculine proper name.
Jungian (adj.)
1921, "of or pertaining to the psychoanalytic school of Dr. Carl Gustav Jung" (1875-1961); for suffix, see -ian.
Laconian (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the region around Sparta," 1570s, from Latin Laconia (from Greek Lakonia; see laconic) + -ian. As a noun from c. 1600.
Lunarian (n.)
1708, "moon-man, inhabitant of the moon;" see lunar + -ian. Also "expert on or student of lunar phenomena" (1817).

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