Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to -al

bicipital (adj.)

"having two heads," 1640s, from Latin biceps (genitive bicipitis; see biceps) + -al (1).

Advertisement
bidirectional (adj.)

also bi-directional, "functioning or occurring in two directions," by 1941, from bi- + direction + -al (1). Originally of microphones. Related: Bidirectionally.

bipedal (adj.)

c. 1600, "having two feet," from biped + -al (1). Classical Latin bipedalis meant "two feet long or thick."

botanical (adj.)

"concerned with the study or cultivation of plants," 1650s, from botanic + -al. Related: Botanically.

bridal (adj.)

"belonging to a bride or a wedding," c. 1200, transferred use of noun bridal "wedding feast," Old English brydealo "marriage feast," from bryd ealu, literally "bride ale" (see bride + ale); the second element later was confused with suffix -al (1), especially after c. 1600. Compare scot-ale under scot (n.) and Middle English scythe-ale (mid-13c.) "drinking celebration for mowers, as compensation for a particular job." Bridal-suite is by 1857.

bronchial (adj.)

"pertaining to the bronchia," 1735, from Late Latin bronchus, from Greek bronkhos "windpipe, throat" (a word of unknown etymology) + -al (1). Bronchial tube is from 1847. Related: Bronchially.

callosal (adj.)

"pertaining to the corpus callosum," 1864, from Latin callosus (see callous) + -al (1).

cameral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a chamber," 1762, from Medieval Latin camera "a chamber, public office, treasury," in classical Latin "a vaulted room" (see camera, and compare chamber) + -al (1).

caudal (adj.)

"pertaining to or situated near a tail," 1660s, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin, + -al (1).

centrifugal (adj.)

"flying off or proceeding out from a center," 1690s, with adjectival suffix -al (1) + Modern Latin centrifugus, 1687, coined by Sir Isaac Newton in "Principia" (which is written in Latin), from Latin centri-, alternative combining form of centrum "center" (see center (n.)) + fugere "to flee" (see fugitive (adj.)). Centrifugal force is Newton's vis centrifuga.

Page 6