Etymology
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Words related to -age

parsonage (n.)

"house for a parson," late 15c.,from Old French personage and directly from Medieval Latin personagium; see parson + -age. Earlier it meant "benefice of a parson" (late 14c.).

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peerage (n.)

mid-15c., "peers collectively," from peer (n.) + -age. Probably on model of Old French parage. Meaning "rank or dignity of a peer" is from 1670s. In titles of books containing a history and genealogy of the peers, by 1709.

peonage (n.)

the work or condition of a peon; a form of servitude formerly prevailing in Mexico," "1848, American English, from peon (q.v.) + -age.

percentage (n.)

"a proportion or rate per hundred," 1789, from percent + -age. Commercial sense of "profit, advantage" is from 1862.

pilferage (n.)

"act or practice of petty theft; that which is stolen," 1620s, from pilfer + -age.

pilgrimage (n.)

late 13c., pelrimage, "act of journeying through a strange country to a holy place, long journey undertaken by a pilgrim;" from pilgrim + -age and also from Anglo-French pilrymage, Old French pelrimage, pelerinage "pilgrimage, distant journey, crusade," from peleriner "to go on a pilgrimage." Modern spelling is from early 14c. Figurative sense of "the journey of life" is by mid-14c.

postage (n.)

1580s, "the sending of mail by post;" 1650s as "rate or charge on letters or other articles conveyed, cost of sending something by mail," from post (n.3) + -age. Postage stamp is attested from 1840 for "official mark or stamp affixed or embossed as evidence of payment of postage." The things themselves were noted as being collected in albums by 1862. As the type of something very small by 1962.

poundage (n.)

early 15c., "tax or subsidy per pound of weight;" 1903 as "weight;" from pound (n.1) + -age.

reportage (n.)

"the describing of events," 1877, from French; see report (v.) + -age.

roughage (n.)

1883, "rough grass or weeds, refuse of crops suitable for bedding for animals," from rough (adj.) + -age. In nutritional science, the meaning "coarse, bulky food" is attested by 1927.

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