Etymology
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Words related to *teue-

butter (n.)

Old English butere "butter, the fatty part of milk," obtained from cream by churning, general West Germanic (compare Old Frisian, Old High German butera, German Butter, Dutch boter), an early loan-word from Latin butyrum "butter" (source of Italian burro, Old French burre, French beurre), from Greek boutyron. This is apparently "cow-cheese," from bous "ox, cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + tyros "cheese" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"); but this might be a folk etymology of a Scythian word.

The product was used from an early date in India, Iran and northern Europe, but not in ancient Greece and Rome. Herodotus described it (along with cannabis) among the oddities of the Scythians. In old chemistry, applied to certain substances of buttery consistency. Butter-knife, a small, dull knife used for cutting butter at the table, is attested from 1818.

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contumely (n.)

"insolent, offensive, abusive speech," late 14c., from Old French contumelie, from Latin contumelia "a reproach, insult," probably derived from contumax "haughty, stubborn, insolent, unyielding," used especially of those who refused to appear in a court of justice in answer to a lawful summons, from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + tumere "to swell up" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell").

The unhappy man left his country forever. The howl of contumely followed him across the sea, up the Rhine, over the Alps; it gradually waxed fainter; it died away; those who had raised it began to ask each other, what, after all, was the matter about which they had been so clamorous, and wished to invite back the criminal whom they had just chased from them. [Thomas Babington Macaulay, "Lord Byron," 1877]
creosote (n.)

substance prepared from wood-tar, 1835, from German Kreosot, coined 1832 by its discoverer, German-born natural philosopher Carl Ludwig, Baron Reichenbach, from Greek kreo-, combining form of kreas "flesh" (from PIE root *kreue- "raw flesh") + soter "preserver," from soizein "save, preserve" (perhaps from PIE root *teue- "to swell"). So called because it was used as an antiseptic and to preserve meat. The creosote-bush (1851) is so called for its smell.

intumescence (n.)

"swollen state, expansion," 1650s, from French intumescence (17c.), from Latin intumescere "to swell up, rise, be elevated," of sounds, "grow louder," figuratively, "grow excited, become enraged," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + tumescere "begin to swell, swell up," figuratively "grow excited, become enraged," inceptive of tumere "to swell" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"), with inchoative suffix -escere.

intumescent (adj.)

"swelling up," 1796, from Latin intumescentem (nominative intumescens), present participle of intumescere "to swell up, rise, be elevated," of sounds, "grow louder," figuratively, "grow excited, become enraged," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + tumescere "begin to swell, swell up," figuratively "grow excited, become enraged," inceptive of tumere "to swell" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"), with inchoative suffix -escere.

protuberance (n.)

1640s, "a swelling tumor on the body; anything swelled or pushed beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface," from Late Latin protuberantem (nominative protuberans), present participle of protuberare "to swell, bulge, grow forth," from Latin pro "forward" (see pro-) + tuber "lump, swelling" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"). Meaning "fact or condition of swelling or pushing beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface" is by 1680s. Related: Protuberancy.

protuberant (adj.)

"prominent beyond the surrounding surface," 1640s, from French protubérant (16c.) and directly from Late Latin protuberantem (nominative protuberans), present participle of protuberare "to swell, bulge, grow forth," from Latin pro "forward" (see pro-) + tuber "lump, swelling" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"). Related: Protuberantly.

psychosomatic (adj.)

1847, "pertaining to the relation between mind and body; relating to both soul and body," from Greek psykhē "mind" (see psyche) + sōmatikos, from sōma (genitive sōmatos) "body" (see somato-). Applied from 1938 to physical disorders with psychological causes. Etymologically, it could as easily apply to emotional disorders with physical causes, but it is rarely so used.

somato- 

before vowels somat-, word-forming element meaning "the body of an organism," from combining form of Greek sōma (genitive sōmatos) "the body, a human body dead or living, body as opposed to spirit; material substance; mass; a person, human being; the whole body or mass of anything," a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps originally "compactness, swelling," and from PIE root *teue- "to swell."

-some (3)

word-forming element meaning "the body," Modern Latin, from Greek sōma "the body" (see somato-).