Etymology
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Words related to *streb(h)-

anastrophe (n.)

"inversion of usual word order," 1570s, from Greek anastrophē "a turning back, a turning upside down," from anastrephein "to turn up, turn back, turn upside-down," from ana "back" (see ana-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn").

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antistrophe (n.)

part of an ancient Greek choral ode, 1610s, from Latin, from Greek antistrophē "the returning of the chorus," "answering to a previous [strophe], except that they now moved from left to right instead of from right to left" [Liddell & Scott], literally "a turning about, a turning back," from antistrephein, from anti "opposite, in opposition to; in return" (see anti-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Antistrophic.

apostrophe (n.1)

"mark indicating an omitted letter," 1580s, from French apostrophe, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos (prosoidia) "(the accent of) turning away," thus, a mark showing where a letter has been omitted, from apostrephein "avert, turn away," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn").

In English, the mark often represents loss of -e- in -es, possessive ending. By 18c. it was being extended to all possessives, whether they ever had an -e- or not.

apostrophe (n.2)

"a turning aside of an orator in the course of a speech to address briefly some individual," 1530s, from French apostrophe, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos, "turning away," from apostrephein "avert, turn away," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Apostrophic; apostrophize.

boustrophedon (n.)
ancient form of writing with lines alternately written left-to-right and right-to-left, 1783, Greek, literally "turning as an ox in plowing," from bous "ox" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn").
catastrophe (n.)

1530s, "reversal of what is expected" (especially a fatal turning point in a drama, the winding up of the plot), from Latin catastropha, from Greek katastrophe "an overturning; a sudden end," from katastrephein "to overturn, turn down, trample on; to come to an end," from kata "down" (see cata-) + strephein "turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Extension to "sudden disaster" is first recorded 1748.

epistrophe (n.)
1640s, from Late Latin epistrophe, from Greek epistrophe "a turning about, twisting, a turning (of affairs), a moving up and down," from epi "upon" (see epi-) + strophe "a turning" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). In rhetoric, a figure in which successive phrases are followed by the same word of affirmation; also used in music. Related: Epistrophic.
strabismus (n.)
"a squinting," 1680s, medical Latin, from Greek strabismos, from strabizein "to squint," from strabos "squinting, squint-eyed," related to strobos "a whirling round," from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn." Earlier in Englished form strabism (1650s). Related: Strabismal; strabismic; strabismical.
strap (n.)
1610s, "band of leather," from Scottish and/or nautical variant of strope "loop or strap on a harness" (mid-14c.), probably from Old French estrop "strap," from Latin stroppus "strap, band," perhaps via Etruscan, ultimately from Greek strophos "twisted band; a cord, rope," from strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Old English stropp, Dutch strop "halter" also are borrowed from Latin, and the Old English word might be the source of the modern one. Slang meaning "credit" is from 1828.
strep 
1927, in strep throat, short for streptococcus.