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Words related to *pekw-

apricot (n.)

roundish, orange-colored, plum-like fruit, 1550s, abrecock, from Catalan abercoc, related to Portuguese albricoque, from Arabic al-birquq, through Byzantine Greek berikokkia which is probably from Latin (mālum) praecoquum "early-ripening (fruit)" (see precocious). Form assimilated to French abricot.

Latin praecoquis early-ripe, can probably be attributed to the fact that the fruit was considered a variety of peach that ripened sooner than other peaches .... [Barnhart]

Native to the Himalayas, it was introduced in England in 1524. The older Latin name for it was prunum Armeniacum or mālum Armeniacum, in reference to supposed origin in Armenia. As a color name, by 1906.

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biscuit (n.)
respelled early 19c. from bisket (16c.), ultimately (besquite, early 14c.) from Old French bescuit "biscuit" (12c.), altered under influence of cognate Old Italian biscotto, both from Medieval Latin biscoctum, literally "twice-baked," from Latin (panis) bis coctus "(bread) twice-baked;" see bis- + cook (v.). Originally a kind of hard, dry bread baked in thin cakes; U.S. sense of "small, round soft bun" is recorded from 1818.
charcuterie (n.)

"cold cuts of pork, sausage, etc.," 1858, from French charcuterie, literally "pork-butcher's shop," from charcutier "pork-butcher" (16c.), from obsolete char (Modern French chair) cuite "cooked flesh," from chair "meat" (Old French char, from Latin carnem "flesh," originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut") + cuit, past participle of cuire "to cook," from Latin coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen"). Compare French charcutier "pork butcher; meat roaster, seller of cooked (not raw) meat."

concoct (v.)

1530s, "to digest" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest," from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Meaning "to prepare an edible thing, combine and prepare the elements of" is from 1670s, metaphorically extended beyond cooking to "devise, plan" by 1792. Related: Concocted; concocting.

concoction (n.)

1530s, "digestion" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin concoctionem (nominative concoctio) "digestion," noun of action from past participle stem of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest," from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Meaning "that which is concocted" is by 1850, figurative; meaning "a devising, a planning, act of preparing and combining the materials of anything" is from 1823.

cook (n.)

"one whose occupation is the preparing and cooking of food," Old English coc, from Vulgar Latin *cocus "cook," from Latin coquus, from coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest, turn over in the mind" from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Germanic languages had no one native term for all types of cooking, and borrowed the Latin word (Old Saxon kok, Old High German choh, German Koch, Swedish kock).

There is the proverb, the more cooks the worse potage. [Gascoigne, 1575]
cuisine (n.)

"manner or style of cooking," 1786, from French cuisine "style of cooking," originally "kitchen; cooking, cooked food" (12c.), from Late Latin cocina, earlier coquina "kitchen," from Latin coquere "to cook," from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

culinary (adj.)

1630s, "of the kitchen;" 1650s, "pertaining to the art of cookery," from Latin culinarius "pertaining to the kitchen," from culina "kitchen, cooking stove, food," an unexplained variant from coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen").

decoct (v.)

early 15c., "prepare by boiling," from Latin decoctus, past participle of decoquere "to boil down," from de "down" (see de-) + coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen"). Related: Decocted; decocting.

decoction (n.)

late 14c., decoccioun, "liquor in which an animal or vegetable substance has been boiled;" early 15c., "act of boiling in water," from Old French décoction (13c.) or directly from Latin decoctionem (nominative decoctio) "a boiling down," noun of action from past-participle stem of decoquere "to boil down," from de "down" (see de-) + coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen").