Etymology
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Words related to *mori-

aquamarine (n.)
1590s, agmarine, "bluish-green type of beryl," from French or Provençal, from Latin aqua marina "sea water," from aqua "water" (from PIE root *akwa- "water") + marina, fem. of marinus "of the sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water"). Apparently first used as a description of a bluish-green color by John Ruskin, 1846. Abbreviation aqua is attested from 1936.
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Armorica 
ancient name for Brittany, from Gallo-Roman Aremorica, literally "before the sea," with a Celtic prefix meaning "before" (compare Old Irish ar) + mare "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water").
beche-de-mer (n.)
"sea-slug eaten as a delicacy in the Western Pacific," 1814, from French bêche-de-mer, literally "spade of the sea," a folk-etymology alteration of Portuguese bicho do mar "sea-slug," literally "worm of the sea."
cormorant (n.)

"large, black swimming and diving bird," early 14c., cormeraunt, from Old French cormarenc (12c., Modern French cormoran), from Late Latin corvus marinus "sea raven" + Germanic suffix -enc, -ing. The -t in English probably is from confusion with words in -ant. See corvine + marine (adj.). The birds are proverbially voracious, hence the word was applied to greedy or gluttonous persons (1530s).

mare (n.2)

"broad, dark area of the moon," 1765, from Latin mare "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water"). Applied to lunar features by Galileo and used thus in 17c. works written in Modern Latin. They originally were thought to be actual seas.

marina (n.)
1805, "a promenade by the sea," from Spanish or Italian marina "shore, coast," from Latin marinus "of the sea, maritime," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." Meaning "dock or basin with moorings for yachts and small craft" is 1935, American English.
marinate (v.)

"to pickle (fish, meat) in a marinade," 1640s, from French mariner "to pickle in (sea) brine," from Old French marin (adj.) "of the sea," from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." Related: Marinated; marinating.

marine (adj.)

mid-15c., "found in or pertaining to the sea," from Old French marin "of the sea, maritime," and directly from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." The Old English word was sælic.

mariner (n.)

"seaman, sailor, one who directs or assists in navigating a ship," mid-13c., from Anglo-French mariner, Old French marinier "seaman, sailor" (12c.), from Medieval Latin marinarius "sailor," "of the sea, maritime," from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." Earlier and long more common than sailor. A sailor also could be a brimgeist in Old English.

maritime (adj.)

1540s, "of or pertaining to the sea," from French maritime (16c.) or directly from Latin maritimus "of the sea, near the sea," from mare (genitive maris) "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water") + Latin ending -timus, originally a superlative suffix (compare intimus "inmost," ultimus "last"), here denoting "close association with." Maritimes "seacoast regions of a country" is from 1590s; specifically of the southeasternmost provinces of Canada adjoining the Atlantic Ocean by 1921.