Etymology
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Words related to *men-

remount (v.)

also re-mount, late 14c., remounten, "restore, revive, return to a former state," also "put on horseback again;" from Anglo-French remounter, Old French remonter "to climb up, ascend again," from re- (see re-) + monter (see mount (v.)). From late 15c. as "to go up again," 1620s as "to raise (something) up again." From 1620s of guns; 1680s of cavalry regiments. Related: Remounted; remounting.

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surmount (v.)
early 14c., "to rise above, go beyond," from Old French surmonter "rise above," from sur- "beyond" (see sur- (1)) + monter "to go up" (see mount (v.)). Meaning "to prevail over, overcome" is recorded from late 14c. Related: Surmounted; surmounting.
ultramontane (adj.)

1590s, from French ultramontain "beyond the mountains" (especially the Alps), from Old French (early 14c.), from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- (1) "beyond") + stem of mons "hill" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Used especially of papal authority, though "connotation varies according to the position of the speaker or writer." [Weekley]

admonish (v.)

mid-14c., amonesten "remind, urge, exhort, warn, give warning," from Old French amonester "urge, encourage, warn" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere "bring to mind, remind (of a debt);" also "warn, advise, urge," from ad "to," here probably with frequentative force (see ad-) + monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

The -d- was restored on Latin model in English as in French (Modern French admonester). The ending was influenced by words in -ish (such as astonish, abolish). Related: Admonished; admonishing. Latin also had commonere "to remind," promonere "to warn openly," submonere "to advise privately" (source of summon).

Ahura Mazda 
from Avestan ahura- "spirit, lord," from Indo-Iranian *asuras, from suffixed form of PIE root *ansu- "spirit" (see Aesir) + Avestan mazda- "wise," from PIE *mens-dhe- "to set the mind" (from root *men- (1) "to think" + root *dhe- "to set, put").
ament (n.)
"person born an idiot," 1894, from Latin amentia "madness," from amentem "mad," from a for ab "away from" (see a- (2)) + mentem "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
amentia (n.)
"mental deficiency," late 14c., from Latin amentia "madness," from amentem "mad," from a for ab "away from" (see a- (2)) + mentem "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think") + abstract noun ending -ia.
amnesia (n.)
"loss of memory," 1786 (as a Greek word in English from 1670s), Modern Latin, coined from Greek amnesia "forgetfulness," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + mnesi- "remembering" (found only in compounds), from stem of mnasthai "to recall, remember," related to mnemnon "mindful," mneme "memory;" from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." The usual word in Greek was amnestia, but this had a specialized sense of "forgetfulness of wrong" (see amnesty).
amnesty (n.)
1570s, "a ruling authority's pardon of past offenses," from French amnistie "intentional overlooking" (16c.), from Latin amnestia, from Greek amnestia "forgetfulness (especially of wrong); an amnesty," from amnestos "forgotten; forgetful," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + mnestis "remembrance," which is related to mnaomai "I remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."

Usually specifically of pardons or offers of pardon for a class of offenses against a government. As a verb from 1809. The non-governmental organization Amnesty International was founded 1961 to call attention to the plight of prisoners of conscience, as Appeal for Amnesty; the name was changed 1963.
anamnesis (n.)
"recollection, remembrance, reminiscence," 1650s, from Greek anamnesis "a calling to mind, remembrance," noun of action from stem of anamimneskein "remember, remind (someone) of (something), make mention of," from ana "back" (see ana-) + mimneskesthai "to recall, cause to remember," related to mnemnon "mindful," mneme "memory;" from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." In Platonic philosophy, "recollection of a prior life."

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