Etymology
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Words related to *men-

monstrosity (n.)

1550s, "an abnormality of growth," from Late Latin monstrositas "strangeness," from Latin monstrosus, a collateral form of monstruosus (source of French monstruosité), from monstrum "divine omen, portent, sign; abnormal shape; monster, monstrosity," figuratively "repulsive character, object of dread, awful deed, abomination," from root of monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie-"to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

Earlier form was monstruosity (c. 1400). Sense of "state or quality of being monstrous" is first recorded 1650s. Meaning "a monster" is attested from 1640s.

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monstrous (adj.)

mid-15c., "of unnatural formation, deviating from the natural order, hideous," a variant of earlier monstruous (late 14c.), from Old French monstruos, monstrueuse and directly from Late Latin monstruosus "strange, unnatural, monstrous," from Latin monstrum "divine omen, portent, sign; abnormal shape; monster, monstrosity," figuratively "repulsive character, object of dread, awful deed, abomination," from root of monere "to admonish, warn, advise," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," suffixed (causative) form of root *men- (1) "to think."

Meaning "enormous, huge" is from c. 1500; that of "outrageously wrong, shocking, horrible" is from 1570s. The earlier form monstruous remained "very common in the 16th c." [OED]. As an adverb from c. 1600, but by late 19c. regarded as vulgar or colloquial. Related: Monstrously; monstrousness.

mun (v.)

an auxiliary verb in future indicative, now archaic or dialectal, "shall, will," late 12c., from Old Norse monu, a future tense auxiliary verb ultimately meaning "to intend," ultimately from the PIE root *men- (1) "to think."

Muse (n.)

late 14c., "one of the nine Muses of classical mythology," daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, protectors of the arts; from Old French Muse and directly from Latin Musa, from Greek Mousa, "the Muse," also "music, song," ultimately from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." Meaning "inspiring goddess of a particular poet" (with a lower-case m-) is from late 14c.

The traditional names and specialties of the nine Muses are: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (love poetry, lyric art), Euterpe (music, especially flute), Melpomene (tragedy), Polymnia (hymns), Terpsichore (dance), Thalia (comedy), Urania (astronomy).

Prometheus 

in Greek mythology, a demigod (son of the Titan Iapetus) who made man from clay and stole fire from heaven and taught mankind its use, for which he was punished by Zeus by being chained to a rock in the Caucasus, where a vulture came every day and preyed on his liver.

The name is Greek, and anciently was interpreted etymologically as "forethinker, foreseer," from promēthēs "thinking before," from pro "before" (see pro-) + *mēthos, related to mathein "to learn" (from an enlargement of PIE root *men- (1) "to think"). In another view this is folk-etymology, and Watkins suggests the second element is possibly from a base meaning "to steal," also found in Sanskrit mathnati "he steals."

Piedmont 

region in northern Italy, from Old Italian pie di monte "foot of the mountains," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot") + monte "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Related: Piedmontese.

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