Etymology
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zoo (n.)
c. 1847, short for Zoological Gardens of the London Zoological Society, established 1828 in Regent's Park to house the society's collection of wild animals. The first three letters taken as one syllable. "From a mere vulgarism, this corruption has passed into wide colloquial use" [Century Dictionary]. Slang meaning "crowded and chaotic place" first recorded 1935.
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zoophagous (adj.)
"carnivorous," 1840, from zoo- "animal" + -phagous "eating." Related: Zoophagy; zoophage.
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zoography (n.)
1590s, from zoo- "animal" + -graphy. Related: Zoographer; zoographic.
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zoophobia (n.)
1901, from zoo- "animal" + -phobia. Related: Zoophobic; zoophobe.
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zoonosis (n.)

"disease communicated to humans by animals," plural zoonoses, 1876, from Greek zōon "animal" (see zoo-) + nosos "disease" (see noso-).

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zoolatry (n.)
"worship of animals or an animal," 1817, from zoo- "animal" + -latry "worship of." Related: Zoolater; zoolatrous.
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zoomorphic (adj.)

"representative of animals," especially representative of a god in the form of an animal, 1872, from zoo- "animal" + morphē "shape," a word of uncertain etymology, + -ic. Related: Zoomorphism.

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zoo- 
word-forming element meaning "animal, living being," from Greek zoion "an animal," literally "a living being," from PIE root *gwei- "to live" (source also of Greek bios "life").
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zoophilia (n.)
"attraction to animals involving release of sexual energy," 1899, in a translation of Krafft-Ebing, from zoo- "animal" + -philia. "[F]ormerly not implying sexual intercourse or bestiality" [OED]. The meaning "sympathy or tender care for living creatures" is in the nativized formation zoophily (1886).
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