Etymology
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zebra (n.)
c. 1600, from Italian zebra, perhaps via Portuguese, earlier applied to a now-extinct wild ass, of uncertain origin, said to be Congolese [OED], or Amharic [Klein], but perhaps ultimately from Latin equiferus "wild horse," from equus "horse" (see equine) + ferus (see fierce). Related: Zebrine; zebroid.
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crossing (n.)

mid-15c., "a making of the sign of a cross;" 1530s, "a marking with a cross," verbal noun from cross (v.). From early 15c. as "place or action of passing across;" 1630s as "place where (a river, a road, etc.) is crossed;" from 1690s as "intersection" (originally of streets). Meaning "action of crossing out by drawing crossed lines through" is from 1650s. Crossing-gate is from 1876.

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grating (n.)
"partition or frame of parallel crossing bars," 1620s, from grate (n.).
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cross-street (n.)

"a street crossing another," 1704, from cross- + street.

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crosswise (adv.)

"in the shape of a cross, crisscross, crossing perpendicularly," late 14c.; see cross- + wise (n.).

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crosswalk (n.)

also cross-walk, 1744 a type of garden path that crosses others; 1853 as "pedestrian crossing," from cross- + walk (n.).

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photo (n.)

1860, a colloquial shortening of photograph. The verb is by 1865, from the noun. Photo-finish, of a race that ends with two or more competitors crossing the finishing line at nearly the same time (so a photograph taken at the finish line at the moment of crossing is the only way to determine who won) is attested from 1936. Photo opportunity "arranged opportunity to take a photograph of a notable person or event" is from 1974, said to be a coinage of the Nixon Administration.

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hog-tie (v.)
also hogtie, "bind hands and feet by crossing and tying them," 1887, from hog (n.) + tie (v.). Related: Hog-tied.
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intersection (n.)

1550s, "act or fact of crossing," from French intersection (14c.) and directly from Latin intersectionem (nominative intersectio) "a cutting asunder, intersection," noun of action from past-participle stem of intersecare "intersect, cut asunder," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). In English originally a term in geometry; meaning "crossroads, a place of crossing" is from 1864. Related: Intersectional.

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loganberry (n.)
1893, American English, named for U.S. horticulturalist James H. Logan (1841-1928), who developed it by crossing a blackberry and a raspberry.
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