Etymology
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young (n.)

"young animals collectively, offspring," late 15c., from young (adj.).

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young (adj.)

Old English geong "youthful, young; recent, new, fresh," from Proto-Germanic *junga- (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian jung, Old Norse ungr, Middle Dutch jonc, Dutch jong, Old High German and German jung, Gothic juggs), from PIE *yuwn-ko-, suffixed form of root *yeu- "vital force, youthful vigor" (source also of Sanskrit yuvan- "young; young man;" Avestan yuuanem, yunam "youth," yoista- "youngest;" Latin juvenis "young," iunior "younger, more young;" Lithuanian jaunas, Old Church Slavonic junu, Russian junyj "young," Old Irish oac, Welsh ieuanc "young").

From c. 1830-1850, Young France, Young Italy, etc., were loosely applied to "republican agitators" in various monarchies; also, especially in Young England, Young America, used generally for "typical young person of the nation." For Young Turk, see Turk.

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jeune fille (n.)

1802, French, literally "young girl," from jeune "young," from Latin juvenis (see young (adj.)).

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youngster (n.)

1580s, from young (adj.) + -ster. Earlier was youngling, from Old English geongling.

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Juventus 

Roman god of youth, personification of iuventas "youth, young person," originally "the age of youth" (from 20 to 40), from iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)).

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juvenal (n.)

1580s, "a younth, a young man, a juvenile," from noun use of Latin iuvenalis "youthful, suitable for young persons," from iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)). The Roman satirist is Decimius Junius Juvenalis. As an adjective from 1630s.

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jeunesse doree (n.)

1811, French jeunesse dorée "gilded youth, rich and fashionable young men," from jeunesse "youth," from jeune "young" (12c.), from Latin iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)) + fem. of doré "gilded."

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younker 

c. 1500, "young nobleman," from Middle Dutch jonckher (Dutch jonker), from jonc "young" (see young (adj.)) + here "lord, master" (see Herr). Compare junker.

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juvenescent (adj.)

1759, "becoming young, growing young in appearance," from Latin iuvenescentem (nominative iuvenescens), present participle of iuvenescere "to grow into youth, grow young again, regain youth," from iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)). Its use in a sense of "immature, undeveloped" (by 1875) is etymologically incorrect.

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rejuvenate (v.)

"restore the appearance, powers, or feelings of youth to," 1807, an irregular formation from re- "again" + Latin juvenis "young" (see young (adj.)) + -ate (2). Related: Rejuvenated; rejuvenating.

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