Etymology
Advertisement
yacht (n.)
1550s, yeaghe "a light, fast-sailing ship," from Norwegian jaght or early Dutch jaght, both from Middle Low German jacht, shortened form of jachtschip "fast pirate ship," literally "ship for chasing," from jacht "chase," from jagen "to chase, hunt," from Old High German jagon, from Proto-Germanic *yago-, from PIE root *yek- (2) "to hunt" (source also of Hittite ekt- "hunting net"). Related: Yachting; yachtsman.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
yack (v.)
also yak, "to talk, to chatter," 1950, slang, probably short for yackety-yacking "talk" (1947), probably echoic (compare Australian slang yacker "talk, conversation," 1882). Related: Yacked; yacking.
Related entries & more 
yadda-yadda 
"and so on," 1990s, of echoic origin (compare yatata "talk idly, chatter," 1940s; and yatter "to talk incessantly or idly," 1825).
Related entries & more 
yah (interj.)
exclamation of defiance or dismissal, from 1812. Extended form yah-boo by 1910.
Related entries & more 
yahoo (n.)
"a brute in human form," 1726, from the race of brutish human creatures in Swift's "Gulliver's Travels." "A made name, prob. meant to suggest disgust" [Century Dictionary]. "Freq. in mod. use, a person lacking cultivation or sensibility, a philistine; a lout; a hooligan" [OED]. The internet search engine so called from 1994.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Yahtzee (n.)
dice game, 1957, proprietary (E.S. Lowe Co., N.Y.), apparently based on yacht.
Related entries & more 
Yahweh 
1869, hypothetical reconstruction of the tetragrammaton YHWH (see Jehovah), based on the assumption that the tetragrammaton is the imperfective of Hebrew verb hawah, earlier form of hayah "was," in the sense of "the one who is, the existing."
Related entries & more 
yak (n.)
"wild ox of central Asia," 1795, from Tibetan g-yag "male yak." Attested in French from 1791.
Related entries & more 
yak (v.)
"laugh," 1938, variant of yuck (2); "talk idly," 1950, variant of yack. Related: Yakked; yakking.
Related entries & more 
Yakima 
Native American people of Washington State, 1852, perhaps from Sahaptin /iyakima/ "pregnant women."
Related entries & more