Etymology
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writ (n.)
Old English writ "something written, piece of writing," from the past participle stem of writan (see write). Used of legal documents or instruments at least since 1121.
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fieri facias (n.)
writ concerning a sum awarded in judgment (often requiring seizure and sale of property for debt), Latin, literally "cause it to be done, cause to be made," the first words of the writ, from Latin fieri "to be made, come into being" (see fiat). Second word from facere "to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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capias (n.)
writ of arrest issued by a court in a civil action, mid-15c., from Latin capias, literally "thou mayest take" (typical first word of such a writ); 2nd person singular present subjunctive of capere "to catch, seize, hold" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").
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praecipe (n.)

in law, "a writ commanding something to be done or requiring a reason for its non-performance," c. 1500 (in Magna Carta in Anglo-Latin), from Latin praecipe, imperative of praecipere "to admonish, enjoin, take or seize beforehand," from the opening words of such a writ, praecipe quod reddat "enjoin (him) that he render." From prae (adv.) "before (see prae-) + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." 

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talesman (n.)
"reserve member of a jury," 1670s, from tales "writ ordering bystanders to serve" in place of jurors not in attendance (late 15c.), via Anglo-French (mid-13c.), from Latin tales (in tales de circumstantibus "such persons from those standing about," a clause featured in such a writ), noun use of plural of talis "such, of such kind" (see that).
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supersedeas (n.)
writ to stay legal proceedings, Latin, literally "you shall desist," second person singular present subjunctive of supersedere "desist, refrain from, forebear" (see supersede).
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ca.sa. 
abbreviation of Latin capias ad satisfaciendum, a writ issued upon a judgment in a personal action for the recovery of money (see capias).
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venire 
1660s, elliptical for venire facias (mid-15c.), Latin, literally "that you cause to come," formerly the first words in a writ to a sheriff to summon a jury, from venire "to come," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."
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certorari (n.)

"writ from superior to inferior courts seeking the records of a case," legal Latin, "to be certified, to be informed or shown," a word figuring in the opening phrase of such writs; passive present infinitive of certorare "to certify, inform," from certior, comparative of certus "sure" (see certain).

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mandamus (n.)

"writ from a superior court to an inferior court or officer specifying that something be done by the persons addressed, as being within their office or duty," 1530s (late 14c. in Anglo-French), from Latin mandamus "we order" (opening word of the writ), first person plural present indicative of mandare "to order" (see mandate (n.)). "Its use is generally confined to cases of complaint by some person having an interest in the performance of a public duty, when effectual relief against its neglect cannot be had in the course of an ordinary action" [Century Dictionary]. 

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