Etymology
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worship (n.)
Origin and meaning of worship
Old English worðscip, wurðscip (Anglian), weorðscipe (West Saxon) "condition of being worthy, dignity, glory, distinction, honor, renown," from weorð "worthy" (see worth) + -scipe (see -ship). Sense of "reverence paid to a supernatural or divine being" is first recorded c. 1300. The original sense is preserved in the title worshipful "honorable" (c. 1300).
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worship (v.)
c. 1200, from worship (n.). Related: Worshipped; worshipping.
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sun-worship (n.)
1670s, from sun (n.) + worship (n.). Related: Sun-worshipper (1670s in the religious sense; 1941 as "devotee of sun-tanning").
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devil-worship (n.)

"the worship of evil spirits or Satan by incantations intended to propitiate them," 1719; see devil + worship (n.). Related: Devil-worshipping; devil-worshipper.

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worshiper (n.)

late 14c., agent noun from worship (v.).

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logolatry (n.)
"worship of words," 1810 (Coleridge), from logo- + -latry "worship of."
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angelolatry (n.)
"worship of angels," 1847, from angel + -latry "worship of," with connective -o-.
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bibliolatry (n.)
1763, "worship of books," from biblio- "book" + -latry "worship of." Meaning "worship of the Bible" is from 1847. Related: Bibliolatrist; bibliolatrous.
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symbololatry (n.)
"worship of symbols," 1828, from combining form of symbol + -latry "worship of."
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gynaecolatry (n.)
"worship of women," 1888; see gyneco- + -latry "worship of." Related: Gynaecolater; gynaecolatrous.
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