Etymology
Advertisement
worn (adj.)
c. 1500, from adjectival use of past participle of wear (v.); from Old English geworen. Worn-out "exhausted by wear, made ineffective by overuse" is attested from 1610s in reference to things, c. 1700 in reference to persons.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
shop-worn (adj.)
"shabby from handling while on display," 1838, from shop (n.) + worn (adj.).
Related entries & more 
care-worn (adj.)
also careworn, "oppressed or burdened with cares," 1828, from care (n.) + worn.
Related entries & more 
outworn (adj.)

"worn out; wasted or consumed by wear, use, or time," 1560s, from out- + worn.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Garibaldi 
1862, blouse worn by women in imitation of red shirts worn by followers of Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882), liberator of Italy.
Related entries & more 
attrite (adj.)
"worn down, worn by rubbing or friction" (obsolete), 1620s, from Latin attritus, past participle of atterere (see attrition). Related: Attriteness.
Related entries & more 
napless (adj.)

"worn threadbare," 1590s, from nap (n.1) + -less.

Related entries & more 
frazzle (n.)
"worn-out condition," 1865, American English, from frazzle (v.).
Related entries & more 
lei (n.)
1843, from Hawaiian, "ornament worn about the neck or head."
Related entries & more