Etymology
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workshop (n.)

1580s, from work (n.) + shop (n.). Meaning "gathering for study, etc.," is from 1937.

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atelier (n.)

"workshop," especially the workroom or studio of a sculptor or painter, 1840, from French atelier "workshop," from Old French astelier "(carpenter's) workshop, woodpile" (14c.), from astele "piece of wood, a shaving, splinter," which is probably from Late Latin hastella "a thin stick," diminutive of hasta "spear, shaft" (see yard (n.2)).

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smithy (n.)

"workshop of a smith," c. 1300, from Old Norse smiðja (cognate with Old English smiððe), from Proto-Germanic *smith-ja-, from PIE smi- (see smith (n.)).

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machine-shop (n.)

"workshop in which machines or parts of machines are made and repaired," 1827, from machine (n.) + shop (n.).

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nailery (n.)

"workshop where nails are made," 1798, from nail (n.) + -ery or from nailer "one who makes nails" (mid-15c.) + -y (1).

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workhouse (n.)

Old English weorchus "workshop;" see work (n.) + house (n.). From 1650s in the sense of "place where the able-bodied poor or petty criminals are lodged and compelled to work."

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pottery (n.)

late 15c., "a potter's workshop, place where earthen vessels are made," from Old French poterie (13c.), from potier (see potter (n.)). Attested from 1727 as "the potter's art or business;" from 1785 as "potteryware, vessels made by a potter."

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pro (n.1)

1866 as a shortening of professional (n.). The adjective is attested by 1915 (in golfing's pro shop, workshop run by the resident professional at a club). The use of professional in reference to prostitutes seems to have accounted for proette in sports writing for "female pro golfer" (1968).

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carpentry (n.)

late 14c., "art of cutting, framing, and joining woodwork," carpentrie, from Old French carpenterie, charpenterie "carpentry" (Modern French charpenterie); see carpenter + -ery. Classical Latin carpentaria (fabrica) meant "carriage-maker's (workshop);" in Medieval Latin it was "carpenter's shop." The English word is attested from 1550s as "timber-work made by a carpenter."

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docudrama (n.)

"television drama based on real events," by 1957, American English, from documentary + drama. The first so-called appears to have been written as a stage play, "We Call to Mind," a "dramatic presentation of the development of education and its significance in American life," written by Philip C. Lewis and produced by the Tenafly, New Jersey, Citizens Education Council and the Tenafly Drama Workshop after the defeat of a school budget.

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