Etymology
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worker (n.)
mid-14c., "laborer, toiler, performer, doer," agent noun from work (v.). As a type of bee, 1747. As "one employed for a wage," 1848. Old English had wyrcend "worker, laborer."
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wonder-worker (n.)
1590s, from wonder (n.) + worker, translating Greek thaumatourgos. Old English had wundorweorc "miracle."
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co-worker (n.)

also coworker, "one who works with another," 1640s, from co- + worker (n.). The verb co-work is attested from 1610s.

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wireman (n.)
worker on electrical lines, 1881, from wire (n.) + man (n.).
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carny (n.)
1931, U.S. slang, short for carnival worker (see carnival).
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Vishnu 
name of a principal Hindu deity, 1630s, from Sanskrit Vishnu, probably from root vish- and meaning "all-pervader" or "worker."
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case-work (n.)
"social work carried out by the study of individuals," 1896, from case (n.1) in the clinical sense + work (n.). Related: Case-worker (1909).
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lineman (n.)
1858, worker on telegraph (later telephone) lines, from line (n.) + man (n.). U.S. football sense is from 1894.
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deck-hand (n.)

"person regularly employed as a laborer on the deck of a vessel," 1839, American English, from deck (n.) in the nautical sense + hand (n.) "manual worker."

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manufacturer (n.)
1719, "worker in a manufacturing establishment," agent noun from manufacture (v.). Meaning "one who employs workers in manufacturing" is from 1752.
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